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is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
john lewis, democrat of georgia and civil rights leader. mr. lewis, thank you for being with us here tonight on this historic day. >> thank you very much, rachel, for having me, and thank you nar rich history, telling the story, what happened and how it happened. it is very moving. >> i have to ask, after your long career, especially as a young man in the south, in the american civil rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work inform your own? what has he meant to you over the years? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> well, the leadership, the vision, the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said, if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle and when i met him for the first time. he said to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what
rights movement, how did nelson mandela's work form your own? what's been the interplay between our civil rights movement and his struggle? >> the commitment, the dedication, the inspiration of this one man meant everything to the american civil rights movement. i remember it as a young student in nashville in 1962 and '63 and '64. we said if nelson mandela can do it, we can do it. we identify with the struggle. and when i met him for the first time, he said to me, john lewis, i noknow all about you. i follow you. you inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they h
, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. joining me charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend
in the civil rights and started hearing about what's going on in south africa, some of the leaders of sclc and others would go. it was considered a terrorist far left kind of course. and it was shunned. people would not discuss it in proper mainstream politics. and mandela was considered somebody who was an extreme cause that was in jail and you would see after awhile it evolved into a movement. but it was -- if it had not been for the randall robinsons and the maxine waters and the others that paid a price that built up a movement, a movement of civil disobedience long before it became a cause and started pushing for sanctions and getting artisan athletes to boycott. had it not been because of that movement, it never would have became the movement it was in the united states. >> the national credibility that was lent to it by having those names you mentioned. and charlayne, as you have covered as a journalist, as an activist, you have known nelson mandela since he has been out of prison. and we know that experience certainly like it would for anybody, it changed him. what people don't und
's incomparable. one of us that grew up in the post-civil rights era it tempered a lot of us that got to know him. the mandela way was not only to fight for change but become the change and he symbolized that in epic proportions. few times i was honored to be around him, you were always moved by this balance of gravity and humility, you never saw in anyone else. he was such a humble and great guy at the same time. it is really something that we probably, president obama said, we'll never see again. >> john meacham, i was talking to my 10-year-old girl about nelson mandela, explaining about him, what he had done, the sacrifices he made, the way he changed this country and the world. i'm wondering, though, of course, my 10-year-old girl didn't know an awful lot about nelson mandela. and we won't even talk about my 5-year-old boy. he'll get it in years to come. what do history books write about this man? >> the last lines of the 20th century. he was arguably with john paul ii, martin luther king, he was someone without whom the world would be radically different and worse. while america mourns him t
legislation by a very narrow margin. it didn't happen with civil rights or social security. there was consistently bipartisan ship in all the big major changes. what i'm fascinated with as a conservative. you had the president's top computer guy saying we're getting up to the velocity of the -- we had the president says you couldn't do in government what he did in the campaign, because all those federal regulations screw up everything, and you really can't get it done right. the question i have is if getting up to -- and if in fact the presidential campaign could be creative and remarkably effective, but the government can't be, isn't that sort of an argument against having the government try to run health care for 315 million people. for. >> for starters, let me address the first point. what has change indeed washington isn't a president's interest in reaching out to the other side. it is the opposing party's 100% intrance gens to working with the president's party. when you have the senate mitch mcconnell saying the number one job was stopping the second term, you get a s
, the '60s is a movement, the years of civil rights movement, the '80s, south africa, anti-apartheid activism, i think there was both but it was so riveting and real. even back to sharkville and the killing of 69 people, the kids in '76 in soweto. high school and elementary school children who are gunned down. it's tallas power of the images. you talked about nelson mandela. we did not see him for decades because they forbid his pic churs or voice from being heard. now we have the pictures from south africa. when you have children being gunned down, that is very hard to talk about. >> when we come back, what happened when ted cruz try day friday -- tried to remember nelson mandela this week. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our com
on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> poet author and civil rights pioneer maya angelou needs little person son fied. she wrote and had a tribute to nelson mandela. the white house tweeted it out. here is an excerpt. >> his day is done, done. his wings came on a day reluctant to carry his burden. nelson mandela's day is done. no sun out lasts it's sunset but will raise again and bring the dawn. nelson mandela's day is done. we confess it in tearful voices, yet, we lift our own to say thank you, thank you our david, our great courageous man. we will not forget you. we will not dishonor you. we will remember and be glad that you lived among us, that you taught us, and that you loved us, all. >> i spoke with dr. maya angelou shortly before air time. dr. angelou, i watched the poem you wrote and recited and one of the things you struck me, you refer to him as david, not just south africa's david out our david, our david and our giddian. >> a man, a woman we can all be that particular person who has enough courage to stand up and say i am one. i have enough courage to dare to be a
civil rights movement and after the vietnam war movement, college campuses in the 80s erupted over the apartheid movement. the administration of ronald reagan finally was the first veto override on foreign policy. it was rejected and taken over as jim baker said on "morning joe." taken over by congress. >> why do you think the world was slow when it came to dealing with south africa? >> i have to say that we in the media are partly to blame. we didn't focus that much on what was going on in south africa. until it just became impossible to ignore. when i went the first time in 1985, it was actually the first time that we focused on the people of south africa. both the black and the white and what the human beings of the country were thinking. why the white people thought they were superior to the blacks and did they ever see an end to that thinking? how the blacks were struggling on every level, not just in the streets, but offices where many of them worked. it was initially focusing on the overall idea of those who are fighting against oppression and those who are pressing. we didn
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
are protesting against a lack of immigration policy. you have the civil rights agenda that's coming into fruition. you've got the supreme court now taking up an aspect of obama care, but also that touches on first amendment rights. so a whole lot of pieces of this puzzle that are going to -- i think can be problematic for both parties. but certainly for the republican party if they don't understand how to message themselves and put in place, i think, substantive policies that begin to address some of these issues. >> and you know, john, it's interesting. you get the sense that republicans do sort of see that. eric cantor this week talking about the fact that the gop needs to be able to answer a basic question, how do we address the fundamental problems that people have. with all of that menu of issues you heard michael steele mention, do republicans now run the risk of hubris, thinking obama care means we can go whole hog. we don't have to worry about really appearing uncompassionate when a lot of americans are changing their minds about things like minimum wage or food stamps or i might be one o
. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to stop to pay their respects. some shedding tears. one note read, quote. thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard around the world. michaela? >> thank you, erin. so many felt he was fighting for their freedom as well. freedom from poverty, oppression, whatever. >> i met some kids in south africa that said he is like the madiba. they feel like someone they have a personal connection with and vital to them. >> he was known for visiting dignitaries, he would go around and greet the workers first to shake sure he spent time with them first. >>> in the united states our country's leaders past and present. we heard from president obama last night. let's go to the white house now and hear from brianna keilar. this was a personal moment for barack obama who talked about the influence of nelson mandela when he was a young man. >> reporter: tha
in the civil rights movement the anti-apartheid movement was our opportunity to participate in that way. >> that's so true. we have to leave it there. congresswoman, safe travels. april, thank you for being with me. >> thank you. >>> when question come back, why is it acceptable for a 23-year-old offered $3 billion for an app but $3 billion seems like too much to keep a promise to workers who earned it? workers in an american city. that's coming up. turn to roc® retinol correxion®. one week, fine lines appear to fade. one month, deep wrinkles look smoother. after one year, skin looks ageless. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. take skincare to the next level with new roc® multi correxion® 5 in 1, proven to hydrate dryness, illuminate dullness, lift sagging, diminish the look of dark spots, and smooth the appearance of wrinkles. high performance skincare™ only from roc®. yes. cup your hands together for me. rub it all the way up your hands. any exposed skin. and get the backs of your hands too. put some just around your neck. [ bell rings ] you're good to go. okay great
, this is not right, this cannot stand, we couldn't advance civil rights at home and go through all that we went through, including the martyrdom of martin luther king, who clearly, like gandhi, like mandela, was inspired by gandhi, and not stick up for south africa. >> and you did indeed. he was grateful to you for that. was there one piece of advice that he gave you that really sticks out in your mind? >> yes. when he told me -- he basically was saying, you know if you're in public life and you have public responsibilities, you cannot be free and effective unless you have no personal feelings of anger. he said, you know, you have to -- you have to never give up your mind and heart. it requires a mental and emotional discipline to live in the present and the future, and keep an open door and open mind and an open heart to everyone. i remember one day, oh, about a month after the whole impeachment business was over, henry hyde, who had run the whole show, unbelievably enough, maybe a few months after, it was shortly after, asked for a meeting at the white house, for something that he was interes
. is he forced to make this apology by the north koreans? >>> plus, cnn on the front lines right now in syria's civil war. our own cnn crew gets rare access to one of the most brutal conflicts on the planet right now. there are seniors who have left hundreds of dollars of savings on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors who compare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs pharmacist, call, or go to to get your free, personalized plan comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, cont
various black factions. and the white right wing goes to great lengths to disrupt the negotiations. >> mandela really believed the country was potentially on the brink of civil war. >> reporter: the violence peaks on easter sunday 1993 when a high-ranking anc member is shot outside his home by a white right-wing polish immigrant. >> there was uproar in the country. riots. >> reporter: the country finds itself in a moment of crisis. de klerk and the government are unable to keep the peace. there was only one man who could pull the nation back from the abyss. mandela addresses the country on national television. >> tonight why i'm reaching out to every single south african, black and white, now is the time for all south africans to stand together. >> only he could control the country in a crisis. and effectively, he was president from then on. de klerk was eclipsed. >> reporter: negotiations proceed, building towards a momentous event. >> the first time they were called for dignity was on the 7th of april, 1994. >> reporter: for the first time in its almost 400-year history, south af
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18